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Saturday, January 23, 2010

Black Oystercatcher

I went out a few mornings ago to take some nice photos of local birds and after a few hours I came away with a much better appreciation of excellent wildlife photographers' work. You know, those crystal clear photos where every feather is in perfect detail. Birds are small, paranoid, jumpy creatures and while I've seen a few interesting ones lately, here's the only one that stood still long enough and near enough so that I could photograph him. It's one of a pair of Black Oystercatchers that were hunting up some lunch on the rocks below the Westsong Walkway. These are also identified (in Peterson's "Field Guide to Western Birds" and Wikipedia) as American Black Oystercatchers (Haematopus bachmani). Stay tuned - I've got some Common Goldeneyes, some loons and a Common Merganser in my sights if they ever just relax and float quietly for a bit....

8 comments:

indonesianegriku said...
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indonesianegriku said...
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Dean Lewis said...

That is one kool-looking bird!
Believe that long beak allows for the prying open of oysters.
It's true, the closer you can see these critters, the more impressive.
A cormorant has a beautiful and unique texture to it's feathers that can only be appreciated up close.
What a challenge to set up and get those close-ups. A tripod and remote works well when one can pre-focus on a fixed spot, not always possible or likely to occur.

Wayne said...

I have never seen an oyster catcher on this side. I've never seen an oyster catcher ... until now.

Chuck Pefley said...

I love this guy's bright red beak and red eye. Does he really catch oysters?

Kris said...

We've got a smaller, white version of these here in Tasmania. They're all over the place around my joint.

AB said...

I guess you need a smart red beak to catch oysters. Nice shot

tennisjazz said...

good job Ben!